Immunisations

Child Immunisation Clinic

Every Wednesday afternoon by appointment between 2:00pm and 4:30pm with our practice nurses.

IMMUNISATION SCHEDULE

 

Shingles Vaccination

  • Anyone Aged 70 can have the shingles vaccine on the NHS. You become eligible for the vaccine from the first day of September after your 70th birthday.
  • From September 1st 2016, the shingles vaccine will be offered routinely to people aged 70 and, as a catch up, to those aged 78. You become eligible for the vaccine on the first day of September 2016 after you’ve turned 70 or 78.
  • In addition, anyone who was eligible for immunisation in the previous three years of the programme but missed out on their shingles vaccination remains eligible until their 80th birthday. This includes:
    – People aged 71, 72, and 73 on September 1st 2016
    – People aged 79 on September 1st 2016
 

Seasonal Flu Vaccine 2022

Flu is a highly infectious and very common viral illness that is spread by coughs and sneezes. It is not the same as the common cold. Flu is caused by a different group of viruses and symptoms tend to be more severe and last longer. You can catch flu all year round, but it is especially common in winter, which is why it is also known as ‘seasonal flu’.

Flu causes a sudden high temperature, headache and general aches and pains, tiredness and a sore throat. You can also lose your appetite, feel nauseous and have a cough. If you have flu you generally start to feel ill within a few days of being infected. Symptoms peak after two to three days and you should begin to feel much better after a week or so, although you may feel tired for much longer.

A flu vaccine is available free on the NHS if you:

  • are 50 years of age or over (including those who'll be 50 by 31 March 2022)
  • are pregnant
  • have certain medical conditions
  • are very overweight (– a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or above)
  • are living in a long-stay residential care home or other long-stay care facility
  • receive a carer’s allowance, or you are the main carer for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if you fall ill
  • are a healthcare worker with direct patient contact, or a social care worker

The best way to protect yourselves and others from flu is to get vaccinated. Speak to your GP if you fall in to one of the categories above.

To find out more information please clink the link below.

Flu vaccine - NHS (www.nhs.uk)

 

Pneumococcal Vaccination

Pneumococcal infection can affect anyone. However, some people are at higher risk of serious illness and can be given the pneumococcal vaccination on the NHS. These include:

  • Babies
  • Adults aged 65 or over
  • Children and adults with certain long-term health conditions, such as a serious heart or kidney condition

How often is the pneumococcal vaccine given?

  • Babies receive the pneumococcal vaccine as three separate injections, at 8 weeks, 16 weeks and one year old.
  • People over 65 only need a single pneumococcal vaccination, which will protect for life. It is not given annually like the flu jab.
  • People with a long-term health condition may need just a single one-off pneumococcal vaccination or five-yearly vaccination, depending on their underlying health problem.